Thursday, June 19, 2014

Online Deed Records - North Carolina


The Register of Deeds Office - A Free Alternative  


Many Register of Deeds Offices are digitizing their historical deeds and land grants and putting them online. Several North Carolina counties have already been digitized. Here is a list of counties who currently have their deeds digitized and available to download from the web FOR FREE.


Alamance County - still in the process of being digitized, goes back to 1849 (as of June 2014)
Alexander County - Digitized deeds going back to 1847
Alleghany County - Digitized deeds going back to 1859
Anson County - digitized deeds going back to 1749
Chatham County - digitized deeds going back to 1771
Cumberland County - - digitized deeds going back to 1754
Duplin County - digitized deeds going back to 1749
Forsyth County - digitized deeds going back to 1849
Guilford County - digitized deeds going back to 1771. Click "real estate index & image", Accept the disclaimer, then click the "Old Index books" button
Iredell County - Digitized deeds going back to 1788. Select “Search Online Records” in center of page, Sign in as a Guest, and click on Indexes Prior to 1964 tab
Johnston County - digitized deeds going back to 1789, land division records, plats
Martin County - digitized deeds going back to 1771
Mecklenburg County - digitized deeds going back to 1763
Sampson County
Stokes County -  digitized deeds going back to 1787
Wake County - digitized deeds going back to 1785

Check back with this site often for updates to newly added Counties! - 
* Alexander, Alleghany, Iredell, Wake, Forsyth, and Guilford added 23 Jun 2014!!!

You can also follow my Pinterest Board - North Carolina Deeds and Land Grants - to receive updates to newly added counties.

Many thanks to everyone writing in with new updated links!!!

Additional Information: Check out these helpful posts

Reading land grants in North Carolina which uses Metes and Bounds
Finding Land Grants using the North Carolina State Archives' Online Catalog (MARS)
North Carolina Land and Property from the FamilySearch.org Wiki
Why Use Deeds and Land Grants in YOUR research


Why Use Deeds and Land Grants in YOUR research

William Godwin to Nathan Godwin Sampson County Deed
William Godwin to Nathan Godwin, Sampson County, NC, Deed 1792 (Book 9, p. 172)


Why use Deeds?  

Deeds are a very valuable resource to have in your research toolbox. The primary use of Deeds is to tract the transfer of land from one person or persons to another. In addition, Deeds can be used to learn about familial relationships and to learn who one's neighbors might have been which can be helpful when tracing persons of the same name. Deeds can tell you who lived where and when.

How did North Carolinians Obtain Land and What is the difference between a Land Grant and a Deed?

In North Carolina, in order to obtain land, a person had to first obtain a Land Grant from either the Lords Proprietors of North Carolina (who worked for the King of England) or the North Carolina Secretary of State's Office. The Patent often contained a description of the land, what it was bounded by, ie, waterways, and the names of the people who owned adjacent land. Plat MAPS were drawn up and included in the files. After the patent was in hand, they could do what they wanted with the land - live on it, improve it, will it to their children, or sell it. When the land was sold, it was recorded in a Deed. The Deeds contained information about who was selling (the Grantor), who was buying (the Grantee), and anyone else involved. Such information would include where the Grantors and Grantees currently or previously lived, who had ties or claims to the land, ie, wives who may have a dower interest; and who the neighbors were.

Deeds can help you determine kinship. In 1788, Jonathan Godwin took out a land grant in Sampson County for 50 acres on the East Side of Black Mingo Creek. In 1801, Nathan Godwin sold 50 acres on the East Side of Black Mingo Creek to Elizabeth Bagley, the land previously patented to Jonathan Godwin in 1788. Since there are no deeds of sale from Jonathan Godwin to Nathan Godwin, it could be implied that Nathan had received this 50 acres of land via inheritance from Jonathan Godwin who died in 1791 leaving his widow Rachel in charge of his estate.

Terminology involved when a person applied for a Land Grant
  1. ENTRY:  This is an application that a person filled out to apply for a PATENT to occupy and purchase vacant land
  2. WARRANT:  This is issued once the ENTRY is approved, telling the county surveyor to measure the tract of land
  3. PLAT:  This is drawn up by the surveyor describing the land in metes and bounds
  4. PATENT:  This is the final document written by the Secretary of State conveying the surveyed land to the applicant. Also known as a GRANT

How do I Obtain Copies of Deeds and Land Grants?

The North Carolina State Archives has most recorded deeds on microfilm organized by county and date. These books do not contain the actual "original" deeds because those went home with the person who purchased the land. Some of you may have found some original deeds in your family's possessions. The Archives also has the original Land Grants that were issued by either the Crown or the Secretary of State which have been microfilmed as well. (Some books have not been microfilmed and are available for research).

If you live in North Carolina, you can visit the Archives and pay $0.25 a page to print out a microfilm copy of a deed, or you can order deeds via their online ordering system for $2.00 each and get copies of deeds mailed to your house. This assumes you have already consulted a microfilm copy of that county's deed index and know what book and page number you need, or you have identified the book and page number from an abstract book.

If you live outside of North Carolina, you can order copies of deeds at $20.00 each, which is a pretty steep price to pay.

The Archives has all of its Land Grants indexed in their online catalog system (MARS). I have written a post about how to find Land Grants using the MARS system here.

Alternatives to ordering deed records from the Archives include ordering the microfilm from your local Family History Library for a small fee of less than $10. The microfilm can then be viewed at your local Family History Library during the time you have the film on loan from the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, UT. This process can take some time because you have to order the index first which is on a microfilm all by itself. Then you have to order a separate film for the book and page number containing the deed of interest.

The Register of Deeds Office - A Free Alternative - many North Carolina Register of Deeds Offices are digitizing their historical deeds and land grants and putting them online. Several North Carolina counties have already been digitized. Click this link for a list of counties that have already been digitized.


Additional Information: Check out these helpful posts

Reading land grants in North Carolina which uses Metes and Bounds
Finding Land Grants using the North Carolina State Archives' Online Catalog (MARS)
North Carolina Land and Property from the FamilySearch.org Wiki

Friday, June 6, 2014

Ancestry.com Discontinues Y-DNA and mtDNA testing services


Ancestry.com made some very big announcements on their blog this week: 

  1. Ancestry.com will no longer sell the Y-DNA and mtDNA kits –  deciding to focus on their autosomal DNA test only
  2. Ancestry.com will no longer keep Y-DNA and mtDNA samples in storage – all samples will be destroyed and cannot be used to upgrade to an autosomal DNA test
  3. Ancestry.com will no longer offer access to your Y-DNA and mtDNA results – all results must be downloaded before September 5th, 2014 when they will be permanently removed from their servers


WHAT TO DO?

  1. Contact your matches! 
  2. Download your results to a CSV file. 
  3. Transfer your Y-DNA results to Family Tree DNA (ftDNA). They are offering the low price of $19 for the transfer of both the Ancestry.com 33 and 46 marker tests. Upgrades are available to ftDNA’s standard 25 and 37 marker tests for an additional fee of $39. See ftDNA FAQs Why upgrade to more markers? 
    • The $19 fee allows you to transfer your results to ftDNA and to join projects; however, you will not receive matches or a haplogroup prediction. Your results will be available to your project administrator and will be displayed in your project's public page. 
  4. Once your results are transferred, join the appropriate surname project in ftDNA
  5. Join the appropriate Y-Haplogroup project and geographic projects to learn more about your Y-DNA results and ancestry. 
  6. Upload your Y-DNA results to Ysearch.org. This database is free and searchable by surname, results, or user ID. It is FREE!

What about my mtDNA?

There currently is no company offering transfer of your mtDNA results. I recommend that you upload your results to mitosearch.org for FREE.

Other Ancestry.com Discontinued Services and Products:

A number of other recently acquired products will no longer be supported or made available to users:

  • Genealogy.com service, including the message boards
  • The MyFamily website. All content can be downloaded and zipped up but must be downloaded by September 5th, 2014
  • MyCanvas story creation and printing service
  • Mundia

For more information, check out CeCe Moore's full report and Ancestry.com's LegacyDNA FAQs

Saturday, May 31, 2014

The Will of John Dyer of DeKalb Co., TN 1844

In my last post, I introduced my 6th great-grandfather, John Dyer who married Mary Polly Youngblood. I confirmed the relationship between him and my 5th great-grandmother, Sally Elvira Dyer by downloading a copy of his will from the FamilySearch website. What an awesome resource! We are so lucky to have the FamilySearch website!


John Dyer’s will listed his twelve children by name and also listed several of his tracts of land that he owned in both Putnam County, Tennessee (where he previously lived) and in De Kalb County, Tennessee (where he lived when he wrote his will). His list of twelve children included my 5th great-grandmother, Sally Elvira (Dyer) Burton. It also mentioned Mahala Carr who is the ancestor of my grandfather’s DNA match.

Will of John Dyer, DeKalb Co., TN, 1844, p. 50-51

Will of John Dyer, DeKalb Co., TN, 1844, p. 53


The Will of John Dyer [1]
Transcribed by Ginger R. Smith, ginger.reney@gmail.com, 29 May 2014
Written 27 Sept 1844
DeKalb Co., TN

I John Dyer do make and publish this my last will and testament, hereby revoking and making void all other wills by me at any time made. First I desire that my funeral expenses and all my debts be paid as soon after my death as possible out of my money that I may die possessed of or may come to the hands of my executors. Secondly, I give and bequeath to my son Jefferson D Dyer my tract of land in Putnam County, Tennessee lying on the Walton road it being the tract on which I lived and from which I moved when I settled in Dekalb County said tract is supposed to contain about two hundred acres. Thirdly I give and bequeath to my son John M Dyer my tract of land in Putnam County Tennessee known as the Crider place said tract of land joins the land of John Ripeto, Abram Buck and Montgomery Kenard and others said tract is supposed to contain two hundred acres. Fourthly I do leave to my beloved wife Polly Dyer all my tract of land in Dekalb County where I now live during her natural life and after her death I give and bequeath said land to my son Carol Dyer and my Daughters Nancy and Manerva Dyer in the following portions to wit, to my son Carrol Dyer two thirds of said tract and to my daughters Nancy and Manerva one third divided between them. Fifthly I desire that all my perishable property be sold as soon after my death as convenient and credit of twelve months and out of the proceeds of said sales I give and bequeath to my daughters Maltursoto and Peggy as soon as they many marry or come of adult? age as much as my other daughters had given to either of them by me when they married. Sixthly I give and bequeath to my daughters Maria Matthews, Matilda Gormin, Mahala Carr, Polly Robe__, and Sally Burton ten Dollars each. Seventhly I do give and bequeath the balance after taking out the above bequests to my beloved wife Polly Dyer and my son Carrol Dyer and my daughters Malhusodo, Peggy, Nancy, and Manerva equally between them for the purpose educating and clothing them. I desire that my executors sell my tract of land in Putnam County known as the Triffato Waller either at private or public sale to the best advantage and the proceeds disposed of as the proceeds of the perishable property. Lastly I do hereby nominate and appoint my friends Wm H Richardson and Alexander Martin my executors in witness whereof I do to this my last will set my hand and seal this 27th day of September 1844.
                                                                                John (His Mark) Dyer

Signed sealed and published in our presence and we have subscribed our names hereto in the presence of the Testator this 27th day of September 1844.

Magor (his mark) Marcun
Zachariah (his mark) Kirkland

State of Tennessee
Dekalb County                                  October Term 1844

A paper purporting to be the last will and testament of John Dyer dec’d was presented in open court for probate and was duly proven in open court by the oaths of Magor Marcun and Zachariah Kirkland, subscribing witnesses to the same who being first duly sworn depose and say that they were acquaintances with John Dyer the testator and that he made his mark to said will and acknowledged that he executed the same for the purpose therein specified and by his request they became subscribing witnesses to the same and acknowledge that said will be recorded. Given under my hand at office the 7th day of October 1844.
                                                                Wm B Lawrence Clk
                                                                Of Dekalb County Court



John Dyer’s 12 Children mentioned in his will:

1.       Jefferson D Dyer
2.       John M Dyer
3.       Carol Dyer
4.       Nancy Dyer
5.       Manerva Dyer
6.       Maltursoto Dyer
7.       Peggy Dyer
8.       Matilda Gowin
9.       Mahala Carr
10.   Polly Roberts
11.   Maria Mattheny
12.   Sally Burton

Land and Property:

According to this will, John Dyer previously lived in Putnam Co., TN before moving to Dekalb Co. He owned 200A in Putnam Co., TN located on the old Walton Road where he previously lived. This land he willed to his son Jefferson D Dyer; He also owned another 200A tract of land in Putnam Co., TN known as the Crider Place which joined the land of John Ripeto, Abram Buck, and Montgomery Kenard. This tract he willed to his son John M Dyer. The other tract of land he owned in Putnam Co., TN was known as Buffalo Waller and this was to be sold with the proceeds divided between his daughters Mathursa and Peggy.

The land John lived on in DeKalb Co., TN at the time he wrote his will was not described and it was willed to his wife Polly Dyer. I am currently in the process of looking for the will of his wife Mary Polly Dyer. I have not yet found it. Unfortunately, the will book posted to the FamilySearch website is not indexed. A look at the Putnam and DeKalb Co., TN deeds would help me determine what happened to these tracts of land.

I have not yet started researching the members of this family, so I have a lot of work ahead of me. John and Mary Polly Dyer's daughter Sally Dyer was my 5th great-grandmother. She married Charles Burton. If you are connected to this family, I would love to hear from you. Please leave a comment below or email me.



Sources:


[1] DeKalb County, Tennessee, Wills, 1838-1854, Vol. A, p. 50, John Dyer, 1844; County Court Clerk’s Office; digital images, “Tennessee, Probate Court Books, 1795-1927,” FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 22 April 2014).



Friday, May 30, 2014

Confirmed DNA Connections – Dyers and Youngbloods



My 6th great-grandfather on my father’s father’s side was John Dyer. He was married to Mary Youngblood and their daughter Sally Elvira Dyer was married to my 5th great-grandfather, Charles C Burton. I knew about John Dyer previously because my grandfather Darrel had included him in his Family Tree File that I inherited back in 2005. 

Although I was aware of these ancestors and knew they were listed in my grandfather’s family history file, I did not put much stock in them as I had yet to “prove” them…or at a minimum, find some evidence to their existence, and more importantly, to their relationship status.

I usually only refer to my grandfather’s family history file as a guide. Is it sourced? Mostly, no. But it’s still useful to me as a guide.  I have it saved as a separate file that can be easily accessed. I have only included those ancestors that I have found evidence for in my own personal working genealogy file.

I had seen DYER pop up in several surname lists of my grandfather’s DNA matches, so it’s been on my radar lately. Before I managed to follow up on my grandfather’s Dyer matches, I received an email from one of his DNA matches who suggested that our connection was the Youngblood family.

My John Dyer had married Mary Youngblood. I had no other information about this couple, other than they were the parents of my 5th great-grandmother, Sally Elvira Dyer who married Charles C Burton.

This match is a descendant of Jeremiah Youngblood and Susannah Birgit. According to her, Jeremiah was born on July 22nd, 1765 in Johnston County, North Carolina. Evidently, he served in the War of 1812 and while he was on furlough, he left his camp in Mississippi to return to his home in Tennessee and while he was travelling, he died suddenly. He died on the 6th of December, 1814 somewhere in Alabama. He was buried where he died in Alabama, but the whereabouts of his burial place are unknown at this time. He had no will.

                Although Jeremiah did not leave a will, it is believed he and Susannah were the parents of nine known children: James, William, Ambrose, Jeremiah, Susannah, George Bradley, John Fanning, Theodrick Birgit, and another daughter, believed to have been called “Polly.” [1]

                I did not find any more evidence that my Mary Polly Youngblood was the daughter of Jeremiah Youngblood and Susannah Birgit. However, my grandfather being a DNA match to a Youngblood descendant was evidence to me that this relationship was probable. Not only was he a match to this descendant, but he was also a match to her mother.

On top of being a DNA match to this woman and her mother, my grandfather was also a match to this person’s cousin (and several of her family members) who also descends from Jeremiah Youngblood, Jr. Both of these Youngblood descendants descend from Jeremiah Youngblood Jr’s son John Hampton Youngblood – one descends from he and his first wife and one descends from he and his second wife.

After I finished adding my grandfather’s new cousins to our family tree, I got an email from another one of my grandfather’s matches who has been trying to find a connection with us for 2 or 3 years. I had decided that the connection was via our West line, though I had not yet determined how.

Out of the blue she asked me if I descended from Mary Polly Youngblood and John Dyer. Of course I got all excited because we had finally found the connection! Now here’s where some DNA sleuthing comes into play. I asked her if she matched any of the Youngblood descendants that my grandfather matched to and she said “no.” Because this new match does not match any of the other Youngblood descendants, we can conclude that our connection is on the DYER side of the family and not the Youngblood side.

With the previous matches, our common ancestors were Jeremiah Youngblood and Susannah Birgit. The shared DNA came from either the Youngblood or Birgit line. This could be confirmed by comparing our DNA to some Birgit descendants or by comparing our DNA to other Youngblood descendants who descend from a different Youngblood line (further back than Jeremiah).

In the meantime, we now have a confirmed match with our common ancestor, John Dyer, in addition to our previously confirmed match with Jeremiah Youngblood and Susannah Birgit. I can now go back and look at the segments that these descendants match my grandfather on to see if there are any other matches on these segments who might also be descended from these ancestors. So far, this is a great success story!

Here is my descendancy from John Dyer and Mary Youngblood:

Sally Elvira Dyer (1823-xxxx) & Charles C Burton (1813-1864)
Mahala Angeline Burton (1844-1882) & Ezekiel Maynard (1843-1907)
Saphronia Maynard (1867-1917) & John A Fox (1861-1922)
Fred Fox (1884-1974) & Anna Melvina West (1882-1978)
Reba Fox (1920-2003) & Claude Rual Smith (1919-1996)
My Grandfather
My Father
Me


Sources: 
[1] Quaife, Dorothy Morris. Jeremiah Youngblood: A Genealogy. 1991. (American Press : Fountain Valley, CA). Book. p. 20.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, part 3

On July 10th, 1788, Jonathan Godwin received two patents from the State of North Carolina for 46 and 47 acres each of land lying in Sampson County on the East side of the Little Cohera River and the East side of the Black Mingo River. 

When Jonathan Godwin died in 1791, his widow, Rachel, was allowed to keep his estate in her possession. No mention, however, was made of what was contained in his estate. In 1792 Richard Godwin took an inventory of Jonathan's estate which included only one tract of land containing 50 acres. You can view the contents of his estate in The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, part 1. No description of the land included in the inventory was provided. If Jonathan Godwin received two tracts of land, each approximately 50 acres from the State of North Carolina in 1788, but only one tract appeared in his estate records, then what happened to the other 50 acre tract of land he received from the State in 1788?  

At least one of those tracts of land was identified as being sold by Nathan, Rachel, and Dred Godwin to John Dormond in 1795 (See Part 2). This tract was on the East side of the Little Cohara River. What about the 2nd tract he received on the East side of the Black Mingo River? It is not possible to search the deed records by land description. However, since Nathan, Rachel and Dred Godwin sold the first parcel of land, I thought maybe they might have sold the 2nd one as well. I started my search by looking for Nathan, Rachel or Dred as the grantor in the Sampson County Deed Records (they are on microfilm at the North Carolina State Archives). Since the land was sold after Jonathan's death in 1791, I restricted my search to records after 1791. 

I found one other deed from Rachel Godwin but it was on the Beaverdam Swamp. This was land she had inherited or purchased from Thomas Bullard who was presumed to be her brother. I then moved on to Nathan. There were actually two Nathan Godwins living in Sampson County at this time and they were both buying and selling land quite often. I had to read through each deed in which Nathan was the grantor to find either 1) a description of 50 acres of land on the East side of the Black Mingo being sold or 2) land originally granted to Jonathan Godwin by patent bearing date of 1788. 

I finally found one deed from Nathan Godwin to Elizabeth Bagley which satisfied both of the above requirements. The deed was for 50 acres of land lying on the East side of Black Mingo which was originally granted to Jonathan Godwin by patent bearing date of 1788! (See deed images and transcript below. Click on the image to make it bigger). 


Deed Nathan Godwin to Elizabeth Bagley Sampson County NC 1801-1

Deed Nathan Godwin to Elizabeth Bagley Sampson County NC 1801-2

Sampson County, North Carolina
Nathan Godwin to Elizabeth Bagley

To all to whom these presents Shall come greeting know ye that I Nathan Godwin Junior of Sampson County and State aforesaid planter for and in consideration of the sum of Twelve pounds ten shillings L12.10 current money of the State to me in hand paid by Elizabeth Bagley of Sampson County and State aforesaid the receipt whereal I do hereby acknowledge that I have bargained and sold and by these presents do fully freely and absolutely give grant convey assign and set over to her the said Elizabeth Bagley forever One certain tract or parcell of land lying and being in the county of Sampson containing fifty acres of land more or less situated and lying on the East side of Black Mingo and on the North side of the Beaverdam swamp beginning at a post Oak on the side of mingo Swamp thence South 31 East 120 poles thence a pine thence South 59 West 63 poles to a pine thence North 31 West 120 poles to a Stake thence to the Beginning it being a tract of land granted to Jonathan Godwin by patent bearing date the 10th of July 1788. To have and to hold the same bargained lands and premises together with all buildings fencings houses water ___ and Improvements thereunto belonging unto it and Elizabeth Bagley her heirs, executors, Administrators and assigns forever and I disavow? Nathan Godwin Junior for himself his heirs, Executors, administrators and assigns forever the said bargained lands and premises unto the said Elizabeth Bagley her heirs Executors administrators and assigns against any person or persons whatsoever shall come and I the said Nathan Godwin myself my heirs Executors administrators and assigns will and shall warrant and forever defend the same bargained land and premises unto the said Elizabeth Bagley her heirs and assigns forever and by these presents. 

In witness whereof I the said 
Nathan Godwin have herunto set his hand and affixed his seal this the 26th day of January one thousand eight hundred and one 1801.

Signed sealed and Delivered in the presence of
Nathan Godwin
John Godwin
Micajah Godwin

Nathan Godwin Junior (seal)

State of North Carolina
Sampson County, Feburary court one thousand eight hundred and one then was the within deed from Nathan Godwin to Elizabeth Bagley was proved in open court by the oath of Micajah Godwin and ordered to be registered. 
H Holmes, Clk

State of North Carolina Sampson County then registered this third day of April Anna Domino one thousand Eight hundred and one 
O Holmes Regr


There are several important pieces of information included in this deed: 

1)  This land was located on the East Side of the Black Mingo and contains 50 acres. This is the exact description given of one of the tracts of land that Jonathan Godwin received from the State of North Carolina in 1788. 

2) This land was granted to Jonathan by patent bearing date July 1788, thus further confirming that this is the same tract of land Jonathan received from the State in 1788. 

3) Nathan Godwin is the sole grantor on this deed. However, Micajah, Nathan, and John Godwin were listed as witnesses. It is possible they were relatives of Nathan. 

4) Nathan is listed as "junior" in this deed. At first this threw me off because I was surmising that this Nathan Godwin was the son of Jonathan Godwin. However, many new researchers make the common mistake of believing that someone listed as "junior" is the the son of someone with the same name. This is not necessarily true. More likely, there was another man with the same name who was older, thus he was probably called "Senior" and this younger Nathan was therefore called "Junior." I mentioned earlier that there was another Nathan living in Sampson County at the same time. He was older; probably around Rachel and Jonathan's age. This Nathan was also called "Junior" in the 1795 deed he sold along with Rachel and Dred to John Dormond as discussed in Part 2 of this post series

Conclusion: 

In this series of blog posts, I discussed Jonathan Godwin's Estate which was inventoried by Richard Godwin in Sampson County, North Carolina in 1792 and the land grants which he received prior to his death and their subsequent distribution by his heirs. 

According to the land grants, Jonathan Godwin received two patents of 50 acres each from the State of North Carolina for lands lying on the East side of the Little Cohera River and on the East side of the Black Mingo River. 

When he died in 1791, his widow was allowed to keep his estate in her possession. In 1792, only 50 acres of land was inventoried in his estate. In 1795, Jonathan's widow Rachel, Nathan, and Dred Godwin sold 50 acres on the Little Cohera, land that was originally patented to Jonathan Godwin in 1788, to John Dormond. In 1801, Nathan Godwin sold the 2nd tract of land containing 50 acres lying on the East side of the Black Mingo River to Elizabeth Bagley. This land was also originally patented to Jonathan Godwin in 1788. Therefore, both tracts of land that were originally granted to Jonathan Godwin in 1788 were accounted for and sold by his heirs in 1795 and 1801 respectively. This was determined by using original deed and estate records found at the North Carolina State Archives. 

Because Jonathan's widow Rachel was allowed to keep his estate in her possession following his death in 1791, I can assume that the Rachel Godwin who sold the 50 acres of land on the East side of the Little Cohera in 1795 was his widow. I am also surmising that because Nathan and Dred Godwin were listed on the deed as well (actually Nathan was the grantor and Rachel and Dred were co-signers), that the three of them were co-owners of the land and therefore heirs of Jonathan. More specifically, I believe Nathan and Dred were both sons of Rachel and Jonathan Godwin. This belief is further supported by Nathan Godwin selling the 2nd tract of land originally granted to Jonathan Godwin in 1788 lying on the East side of the Black Mingo to Elizabeth Bagley in 1801. Although there is no deed (that I could find) in which Jonathan sold this land to Nathan, I believe Nathan inherited it from his father, Jonathan Godwin either shortly before or after he died in 1791. 

By using original estate and deed records, I am able to hypothesize that Nathan and Dred Godwin were sons of Jonathan and Rachel Godwin. 

Can this be proved? 

Possibly...maybe a DNA test can provide me with more information? What do you think? Have I provided a good enough case to convince you that my family structure is correct?  

The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, Part 1
The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, Part 2
The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, Part 3

Sunday, April 6, 2014

The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, part 2

On July 10th, 1788, Jonathan Godwin received two patents from the State of North Carolina for 46 and 47 acres each of land lying in Sampson County on the East side of the Little Cohera River and the East side of the Black Mingo River. 

When Jonathan Godwin died in 1791, his widow, Rachel, was allowed to keep his estate in her possession. No mention, however, was made of what was contained in his estate. In 1792 Richard Godwin took an inventory of Jonathan's estate which included only one tract of land containing 50 acres. You can view the contents of his estate in The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, part 1. No description of the land included in the inventory was provided. If Jonathan Godwin received two tracts of land, each approximately 50 acres from the State of North Carolina in 1788, but only one tract appeared in his estate records, then what happened to the other 50 acre tract of land he received from the State? 

It appears as if one tract of land that was granted to Jonathan Godwin by the State in 1788 was sold by Nathan Godwin in 1795 to John Dormand. Rachel and Dred Godwin were co-signers on the deed. Nathan and Dred Godwin were probably sons of Rachel and Jonathan Godwin and this tract of land was probably the 50 acres of land that was left in Rachel's possession after the death of her husband in 1791 and probably the same 50 acres of land that was mentioned in Jonathan's estate inventory. The tract of land described below was the one that was located on the East side of the Little Cohara (River) on the Mill Branch. (Click each image to make them bigger - Transcripts below)

Deed Rachel Nathan and Dred Godwin to John Dormand Sampson Co NC - 1

Deed Rachel Nathan and Dred Godwin to John Dormand Sampson Co NC - 2


State of North Carolina, Sampson County Deeds
Nathan Godwin and others to John Dormond, 14 Dec 1795

This Indenture made this 14th day of December one thousand seven hundred and Ninety Five Between Nathan Godwin Junior of Sampson County of the one part and John Dormond of the same County at the other part and State of North Carolina Witnesseth that the said Nathan Godwin for and in consideration of the sum of Seven pounds to him in hand paid By the said John Dormond at and before the unsealing and delivery of these presents the Receipt whereof I as hereby acknowledge myself to be fully satisfied contented and paid Hath given granted bargained and sold unto the said John Dormond his heirs and assigns forever. One parcell or tract of land containing by estimation forty six acres of land be the same more or less it lying in Sampson County on the East side of Little Cohara and on the Mill Branch. Beginning at a pine near the corner of a pond thence South 55 West 86 poles to a Red Oak thence South 35 East 86 poles to a pine thence North 55 East 86 poles to a Stake thence to the Beginning. It being a parcell of land granted to Jonathan Godwin by patent bearing date July one thousand seven hundred and Eighty Eight in the thirteenth year of our Independence to have and to hold the said piece or parcell of land aforesaid with all woods, waters, house, orchards, gardens, advantages, privileages, and appertanances thereto belonging to him the said John Dormond his heirs and assigns forever the said Nathan Godwin for himself his heirs and assigns doth promise and agree to and with the said John Dormond his heirs and assigns forever that the said Nathan Godwin hath in himself rightful power to give grant sell and deliver and convey the said piece of land unto the said John Dormond his heirs and assigns forever and the said Nathan Godwin and my heirs will forever warrant secure and defend the just right and title to the above said tract and parcell of land and priviliges unto the said John Dormond his heirs and assigns forever against all lawful claims of any person _____ and all ____ of my kind whatsoever. 

In witness whereof I the said Nathan Godwin doth hereby hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the day and year first and before written.

Signed sealed and delivered in the presence of: 
Benjamin Dormond
James Beaman

Nathan Godwin (seal)
Dred Godwin (his mark) (& seal)
Rachel Godwin (seal)

State of North Carolina
Sampson County November Term One thousand Seven hundred and Ninety six then was the within deed from Nathan Godwin and others to John Dormond was proved in open court and ordered to be registered
Hardy Holmes, clk

State of North Carolina
Sampson County Registered in the Registers office at the aforesaid county this the nineteenth day of January anna domino 1798
O. Holmes Regr


There are several important pieces of information included in this deed: 

1)  There are three signatures on the deed - Nathan, Dred, and Rachel Godwin; I believe this is significant and provides evidence that Dred and Nathan Godwin were sons of Rachel and Jonathan Godwin

2) This land was located on the East Side of the Little Cohara on the Mill Branch and contains 46 acres. This is the exact description given of one of the tracts of land that Jonathan Godwin received from the State in 1788. 

3) This land was granted to Jonathan by patent bearing date July 1788, thus further confirming that this is the same tract of land Jonathan received from the State in 1788. 

We still do not know what happened to the other tract of land that Jonathan received from the State in 1788. My next step is to look through the Sampson County deeds to see if it was bought of sold. Because Rachel was his widow and Nathan and Dred were presumed to be sons of Jonathan, I started by looking at deeds carried out by them. 

I will discuss this process in Part 3

Afterword: 

The Sampson County deeds are all online now at the Sampson County Register of Deeds. They can be downloaded for free! Check it out!

The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, Part 1
The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, Part 2
The Distribution of Jonathan Godwin's Estate, Part 3